TUTORS
Tips, Useful Techniques, Other Relevant Stuff

VOLUME 43 ISSUE 1
A LITERACY COUNCIL OF JACKSON COUNTY PUBLICATION
JANUARY 2012 

Ice Crystals

"Ice Crystals" Courtesy of Clayre Shaffer

NOTES FROM THE CHAIR

Dear Volunteers and Friends,

Welcome 2012.  And welcome to our newest volunteer, Mary Burgess.  We can never have too many volunteers, but right now we don't have enough students to keep them busy.  We would appreciate it if our readers would inform those adults who want to improve their reading skills about our service.

Our workplace literacy program needs sponsors to cover the training expense of professional instructors.  A contribution of $100 would pay for one applicant.  The applicant would receive 8 hours of instruction, using a computer, business software, and résumé writing assistance.  Smaller contributions could cover the cost of supplies and study materials.  Training will consist of Microsoft Office programs to writing a successful résumé which will prepare the participant with the skills and tools for a job interview. 

The community will benefit from this stronger base of employees who not only have their skills in hand (language, writing, basic math, and computer skills), but can also be trained to meet the more sophisticated demands of today's employers.  It is also the promise of employment that will remove domestic victims from the roles of entitlement programs, or a return to a volatile situation.  Please contact us if you want to contribute.

Remember, volunteers, our office library has many books and other training materials for ideas to make your sessions more fun and productive.  Marilyn, our librarian, has reorganized the library to make it easier to find just what you might need.  Our office at 670 Superior Court, Suite 208, is usually open on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10 AM to Noon.  However, you should call our voicemail (541-531-0166) to schedule an appointment so you know someone will be there.

Have a great new year.

Bob Burger
Chairman

 

 

 

 

 

COUNCIL INFORMATION

LITERACY COUNCIL OF JACKSON COUNTY
BOARD MEMBERS

    Chair --------------------------------------------- Bob Burger
    Placement --------------------------------------- Liz Koester
    Treasurer --------------------------------- Nancy Calcagno
    Librarian ----------------------------------- Marilyn Wilbur
   Newsletter Editor -----------------------Nancy Calcagno

 

BOARD MEETING DATES

February................................................ TBA
March..................................................... TBA
April........................................................ TBA

(These dates are subject to change)

 

COMMONLY CONFUSED WORDS

adapt (v) to adjust
adept (adj) skilled

alter (v) to change
altar (n) church structure

principle (n) a fundamental truth
principal (n) a governing officer

stationary (adj) immobile
stationery (n) paper

assistance (n) help
assistants (n) those who help

canvas (n) material
canvass (v) watch neighborhood

 

TRIVIA MATCH

Match the book with the author:

1. A Tale of Two Cities
2. War and Peace
3. The Great Gatsby
4. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
5. Pilgrim's Progress
6. The Late, Great Planet Earth
7. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
8. The Call of the Wild

a.) Leo Tolstoy
b.) John Bunyan
c.) F. Scott Fitzgerald
d.) Jack London
e.) Charles Dickens
f.) Roald Dahl
g.) C.S. Lewis
h.) Hal Lindsay


 

PARTS OF SPEECH

Most of us are familiar with verbs and nouns, but what about the other parts of speech that can be difficult to remember?  Listed below are definitions and examples of less familiar parts:

Linking verbs connect or link a word that follows them with the subject.  The most common linking verb is - Be.

Forms of Be:
- Present: is, am, are
- Past: was, were, been

More linking verbs: seem, become, appear, look, feel, get (when it means become)

A conjunction is a word that joins words or groups of words.

and or for but nor yet so either...or both...and neither...nor not only...but also whether...or
just as...so

A preposition is a word that shows how a noun or a pronoun is related to some other word in the sentence.

They show position, direction, and time.
Examples:
in            to            of            at          on      
for          by            from       with      about
except    above      ear         beside  over
toward   against    without  like       below
through  because  around  before  after
under     although  behind  between

 

An interjection is an exclamatory word that is not related to the other words in a sentence.

 

A note from the editor:

Did you hear about the cat who swallowed a ball of yarn?  She had mittens!

 

FOR THE RECORD

Numbers for October - December 2011:

Volunteer Hours ------------------- 135.5
Student Hours ------------------------ 43


Literacy Council of Jackson County
P.O. Box 615
Medford, OR 97501
(541) 531-0166

Website: http://roguelrc.org/litjack
E-mail: literacy@juno.com