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VOLUME 47 ISSUE 1 A LITERACY COUNCIL OF JACKSON COUNTY PUBLICATION WINTER 2016

Winter Rose

"Winter Rose"
Courtesy of Kayla Sargent

NOTES FROM THE CHAIR

Dear Volunteers and Friends,

As we begin another year of service to the Jackson County community, we also begin another search for office space.  On behalf of our board of directors, we give thanks to the Gordon Elwood Foundation for their
support of providing office space since 2011.  If any of our readers know of a room or two in an office building that could be used as a charitable donation, I'd love to hear from you. 

I hope you will find something useful in our issues of TUTORS.  Nancy, our newsletter editor, tries to find articles and challenging puzzles for each issue.  If you have an anecdotal experience you would like to share
with our readers, please email to us for a future issue.  Nancy would love to have her job made a little easier.

Thank you again, dear volunteers, for your service to our community.  I hope you are all looking forward to sharing your knowledge for another year.

To all of our readers - HAPPY 2016!

Bob Burger
Chairman

INDIVIDUALIZED TUTORING

We offer individualized tutoring for Basic Reading, GED, ESL, Workforce Development Classes, and Citizenship.

Our Workforce Development class offers training in Microsoft Office and Résumé Building.

If you know of anyone who might benefit from our program, please let them know about our services. The Literacy Council serves all of Jackson County.

COUNCIL INFORMATION

LITERACY COUNCIL OF JACKSON COUNTY
BOARD MEMBERS

Chair--------------------------------------------- Bob Burger
Placement--------------------------------------- Liz Koester
Treasurer---------------------------------- Nancy Calcagno
Newsletter Editor-------------------------Nancy Calcagno

WE CAN HELP YOU

If you are struggling, or know of someone who is struggling with English skills or reading, we have tutors available for your individual attention, free (at no charge to you).

We help adults learn reading, writing, English, as well as earning a GED, becoming a citizen, improving your job skills, pass a driver's test, computer skills, and more. Call us at (541) 531-0166.

YOU CAN HELP US

We are currently in need of more tutors. If you are interested in becoming a volunteer, we would love to hear from you.

A tutor will typically spend one or two sessions per week with an adult learner. These sessions usually run 60 to 90 minutes long. A tutor and an adult learner often work together for 6 months to 2 years.

There are no credentials required. Simply attend free training sessions and learn how to be an effective tutor!

FUN FACTS ABOUT THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

‘E’ is the most commonly used letter in the English language. In fact, as many as one in eight of all the letters written in English is ‘e’.

More English words begin with the letter ‘S’ than any other letter of the alphabet.

The longest English word that can be spelled without repeating any letters is ‘uncopyrightable’.

The following sentence contains seven different spellings of the sound “ee”: ‘He believed Caesar could see people seizing the seas’.

There is no word in the English language that rhymes with month, orange, silver or purple.

‘Queueing’ is the only word with five consecutive vowels (five vowels in a row). This is a great word to use when you play hangman!

English is the official language of the sky! It doesn’t matter which country they are from, all pilots speak in English on international flights.

Literacy Council of Jackson County
P.O. Box 615
Medford, OR 97501
(541) 531-0166

Website: www.literacyjc.org
E-mail: literacy@juno.com

VISIT YOUR LOCAL LIBRARY

While difficulty with reading, writing, or other basic skills may not be outwardly apparent, we know there are adults who daily face these challenges in every community.

Libraries, whose main mission is built on the bedrock of literacy, have an especially important role to play when it comes to adult learners.

Adult Library collections include print and digital materials that meet the readability needs, goals, and interests of adult learners and the instructional resource needs of adult educators.

Librarians have the training, knowledge, community connections, and will to help adults with low literacy pursue their educational, work, and life goals.

Local libraries in Southern Oregon provide community members with equitable access to technology and the training needed to use it effectively. Each branch offers free broadband Internet, including Wi-Fi, and Microsoft Office programs on their computers. Also offered, are free basic computer classes. For more information, please call the business office at (541) 774-8679.

TEACHING CHILDREN VS. ADULTS

Teaching adults is different from teaching children. Adult literacy programs ask even experienced K-12 teachers to go through tutor training because of these differences. The chart, Children vs. Adults, briefly describes some differences between adults and children as students.

CHILDREN ADULTS
Children are directed by others, such as parents or teachers. Adults are largely self-directed
In general, children have limited life experiences. Adults can draw on a lifetime of experiences.
Children are open to new information; they are malleable and adaptable. Adults have a well-developed belief system; they may reject information that contradicts those beliefs.
Children expect to learn in school; they also tend to learn quickly. Adults have various expectations about learning based on past experiences in school; they generally learn more slowly than children, but they can learn just as well.
Children learn because they are told to learn and they are expected to learn; they expect that their learning will help them in the future. Adults want to meet immediate goals and needs; they need to perceive that their learning experience is valuable and that their time is used wisely.
Children attend classes in a group that is the same age, shares a similar background, and tends to share similar educational skills. Adults come from diverse ages and backgrounds and, as a group, possess uneven skills and educational levels.