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VOLUME 49 ISSUE 1 A LITERACY COUNCIL OF JACKSON COUNTY PUBLICATION WINTER 2018

Winter Rose

"Winter Rose"
Courtesy of Kayla Houser

NOTES FROM THE CHAIR

Dear Volunteers and Friends,

HAPPY NEW YEAR!  I don't know about you, but I'm glad we are not buried in snow.  However, winter isn't over, yet.

The Literacy Council Board is still searching for suitable office space.  If any of our readers know of a room or two in an office building that could be used as a charitable donation, we'd love to hear from you.  We only need enough space for our bookshelves and a small table.  A special thank you to United Way of Southern Oregon for their assistance.  They helped us find a place before - TWICE!

Although the Literacy Council keeps a low profile, people keep finding us.  Welcome new students Jessica, Eric, Don, Randal, Placido, Dean, and Brahim.  Also a grateful welcome to new tutors Gary and Judy. 

Remember, if you were or are a volunteer or student of the Literacy Council, our newsletter editor Nancy would love to receive an article from you for the next issue of TUTORS (see Editor comments).  So, If you have an anecdotal experience you would like to share with our readers, please email it to us.

Thank you again, dear volunteers, for your service to our community.  I hope you are all looking forward to sharing your reading skills with our many students who need your help.

Bob Burger
Chairman

 

DONATIONS

The Literacy Council's sole support is through donations. As our funds are dwindling, we are in need of your help. We are a non-profit organization, and all donations are tax deductible. We appreciate your support!

Literacy Council of Jackson County
P.O. Box 615
Medford, OR 97501
(541) 531-0166

Website: www.literacyjc.org
E-mail: literacy@juno.com

 

 

 

 

 

COUNCIL INFORMATION

LITERACY COUNCIL OF JACKSON COUNTY
BOARD MEMBERS

   Chair ------------------------------------------- Bob Burger
   Placement ------------------------------------- Liz Koester
   Treasurer ------------------------------- Nancy Calcagno
   Newsletter Editor ----------------------Nancy Calcagno

 

A WORD FROM OUR TUTORS

Throughout the years, we have asked our tutors to send us articles about their successes, suggestions on how to have a successful tutoring experience, fun tutoring techniques, and so forth. My inbox is empty. So I am reserving this space for our Spring Newsletter, hoping that you each of you will participate in the coming newsletters.

It is important to share our experiences and learn from each other. This is a powerful tool to help our students. When we come to a road block with a student, we might be able to overcome that struggle from a suggestion that has worked for you.

We would love to hear how you are doing with your students and what helps you succeed. Please send your articles to: literacy@juno.com.

 

THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE HOME

Currently, The Literacy Council of Jackson County is looking for a new home. We are in need of an in-kind donation for office space, large enough to fit our library, desk, and space for tutoring.

Throughout the years, several organizations have been very generous in helping us succeed by offering us a place to call home. These include: Rogue Federal Credit Union, The Gordon Elwood Foundation, and the Teresa McCormick Center.

This is a great opportunity for a business that has extra space available and could benefit from a tax write-off. Not only would it benefit your business, but it would benefit those people in Jackson County that need help in succeeding in the job market and in the community.

Please contact us at (541) 531-0166 if you are interested in donating a space.

 

WE CAN HELP YOU

If you are struggling, or know of someone who is struggling with English skills or reading, we have tutors available for your individual attention, free (at no charge to you).

We help adults learn reading, writing, English, as well as earning a GED, becoming a citizen, improving your job skills, pass a driver's test, computer skills, and more. Call us at (541) 531-0166.

"To learn to read is to light a fire; every syllable that is spelled out is a spark." - Victor Hugo

 

 

 

 

ROOT WORDS

Many English words are formed by taking basic words and adding combinations of prefixes and suffixes to them. A basic word to which affixes (prefixes and suffixes) are added is called a root word because it forms the basis of a new word. The root word is also a word in its own right. For example, the word lovely consists of the word love and the suffix -ly.

In contrast, a root is the basis of a new word, but it does not typically form a stand-alone word on its own. For example, the word reject is made up of the prefix re- and the Latin root ject, which is not a stand-alone word.

Teaching students what a root word is, as well as the importance of a root word, is very important. Knowing the root of a word allows students to build and make new words, as well as to recognize and understand the meaning of a word they are not familiar with.

For example, the Greek word aster and astr means "star." Knowing this, you can start breaking down words and their meanings.

  • Astrology - the belief that stars tell the future.
  • Astronomy - the scientific study of the stars and all the heavenly bodies.
  • Astronaut - a traveler in outer space.
  • Asterisk - a mark (*) that resembles a star.

Each of these words contained some meaning about a star.

I encourage teaching root words with spelling, as well as affixes, to help your student better understand the meaning of words.

 

INDIVIDUALIZED TUTORING

We offer individualized tutoring for Basic Reading, GED, ESL, Workforce Development Classes, and Citizenship.

Our Workforce Development class offers training in Microsoft Office and Résumé Building.

If you know of anyone who might benefit from our program, please let them know about our services. The Literacy Council serves all of Jackson County.

 

YOU CAN HELP US

We are currently in need of more tutors. If you are interested in becoming a volunteer, we would love to hear from you.

A tutor will typically spend one or two sessions per week with an adult learner. These sessions usually run 60 to 90 minutes long. A tutor and an adult learner often work together for 6 months to 2 years.

There are no credentials required. Simply attend free training sessions and learn how to be an effective tutor! "When one teaches, two learn."

"The best way to find yourself is to lose yourself in the service of others. " - Mahatma Gandhi